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Stop the Jabiluka Uranium Mine

Songs From the Northern Territory 5: Aboriginal Music - Travelling Songs ('Song Lines') From Southern Arnhem Land; Also Songs From Bathurst And Melville Islands and Guitar-accompanied Songs by Young Arnhem Land Singers
Alice Moyle
Label Information:
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS): AIAS 5 CD
Media Type:
Recorded 1963; Released 1997

Track Number Track Title Track Time Notes
Boomerang clapsticks sounded by Ganbukbuk, Djanbaluwa (i-v) sung by Garadji with boomerang clapsticks 0:02:39 Ngukurr 1963
Yarangindjirri (i-iii) sung by Mityundurr and Gandukbuk with boomerang clapsticks 0:02:09 Ngukurr 1963
Ngadidji women's corroboree (i-vi) sung by Yabumana and female assistants; boomerang clapsticks sounded by Yabumanat 0:02:42 Numbulwar 1963
Wandimulungu (i-vi) sung by Mardi with improvised percussion (substituted for boomerang clapsticks) 0:03:29 Numbulwar 1963
Djarrkun (i-xvii) sung by Mityundurr with paired sticks 0:06:36 Ngukurr 1963
Galwangara (i-iii), Women's Djarada (i-iii) sung by Wuymalu with improvised percussion (tin beaten with stick) 0:03:44 Barrunga 1962
Army Tent, Bomb on Darwin sung by boys from Bathurst and Melville Islands 0:04:21 Darwin 1962
Song words for track 07 spoken by (a) Tauntalum and (b) Pautalura 0:00:54 Darwin 1962
Dance chants from Bathurst and Melville Islands sung by school boys with hand-clapping 0:02:37 Darwin 1962
Words for track 09 spoken by Tauntalum 0:00:39 Darwin 1962
Songs (Djanba and Balga) by men and women with paired sticks 0:05:15 Darwin 1962
(a) Maningrida Song; (b) Cape Stewart by Minydjun, Ngalakandi and Balimang with Djikululu (Didjeridu) 0:04:26 Milingimbi 1962. The slow, leisurely-paced, didjeridu-accompanied Gunborg (dance) styles (see disc 1) from the northwestern Arnhem Land region are here imitated by Milingimbi singers in the north-east. Two of the performers had just returned from a sojourn in the west and each night, to an interested audience at Milingimbi, they could be heard singing the songs they had brought home. One of the local men, listening to a later playback of the recorded 'Song from Maningrida' (track 12a), remarked with enthusiasm, 'This is beautiful music!'. The sharp fourth apparent in the 'Song from Cape Stewart' (track 12b), is not unusual in songs from further west, but apart from the song's title, which they gave after some hesitation at the time of recording, the singers had nothing further to say about it. In an attempt to trace these two 1962 recordings to their proper source a tape copy was sent to Maningrida. David Glasgow, a linguist working there in the Burera language, played the tape to several audiences and obtained the following information: Track 12a Song from Maningrida: This was recognised immediately. The owner (also said to be the singer) is Crusoe Guningbal, a Gunwinggu speaker who lives at Maningrida. He said that a bird had told him the song at Maningrida about nine years before. It is a love song, or, in Gunwinggu, mardatjin. The essence of the wording is 'my heart is bad (broken). I am going home to lie down and whine.' This type of song is referred to at Maningrida as Borrk. Track 12b Song from Cape Stewart: There was some uncertainty about the identity of this item. A Burera woman claimed that it was a Gunwinggu song sung by Biliyei and that the words are 'You and I sit here singing'. However, the Gunwinggu did not recognise it. Later, a Burera man confidently claimed-and some of the Gunwinggu supported him-that it belonged to a group from Delissaville called Manjangal. He had heard it performed at Bagot by Billy Manji [see disc 1, track 12] and a didjeridu player, Billy Jawutj, and maintained that anyone in that particular group could sing the song. (DG)
Island Dance (i-iii) performed by young men with guitars and ukulele 0:04:14 Ngukurr 1963

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